Methley ConnectionsEdward Shippen

 

Edward Shippen Philadelphia, USA 

Shippen Family

Methley to Pennsylvania

Edward2 Shippen (William1) was born in 1639 at Methley, Yorkshire, England. He was baptized on 5 Mar 1639 at Methley, Yorkshire, England. He married Elizabeth Lybrand circa 1671 at Boston, MA; 1st wife. He married Rebecca Howard, daughter of John Howard, on 4 Sep 1689 at Newport, RI; 2nd wife, 2nd husband. He married Esther Wilcox, daughter of Barnabas Wilcox, in 1706; 3rd wife, 3rd husband. He died on 2 Oct 1712 at Philadelphia, PA, at age 73. He was buried at Friends Burying Ground, Philadelphia, PA.
He immigrated in 1668 to Boston, MA. He and Elizabeth Lybrand resided at Boston, MA. He was a merchant. He was a member of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company in 1669 at Boston, MA. He resided circa 1693 at Philadelphia, PA. He was Speaker of the Assembly in 1695 at Pennsylvania. He was a member of Council in 1696 at Pennsylvania. He was the 1st Mayor from 25 Oct 1701 to 5 Oct 1703 at Philadelphia, PA. He was President of the Governor's Council from 1702 to 1706 at Pennsylvania. He left a will 6mo 2 1712 at Philadelphia Co., PA; proved 5 Aug 1712.
Elizabeth Lybrand died on 25 Oct 1688 at Boston, MA.
Known children of Edward2 Shippen and Elizabeth Lybrand were as follows:
  •       i.   Frances3 Shippen was born on 2 Feb 1672 at Boston, MA. She died on 9 Apr 1673 at age 1.
     
  •       ii.   Edward Shippen was born on 2 Oct 1674 at Boston, MA. He died on 2 Nov 1674.
     
  •       iii.   William Shippen was born on 4 Oct 1675 at Boston, MA. He died in 1676.
     
  •       iv.   Elizabeth Shippen was born on 21 Aug 1676. She died on 16 Aug 1688 at age 11.
     
  •       v.   Edward Shippen was born on 10 Feb 1677/78 at Boston, MA. He married Francina Vanderheyden, daughter of Matthias Vanderheyden and Anna Margaretta Herman; 1st husband. He died 10mo 26 1714 at Philadelphia, PA. He died on 29 Dec 1714 at Philadelphia, PA, at age 36. He was buried at Friends Burying Ground, Philadelphia, PA.
    He resided at Philadelphia, PA. He left a will on 8 Dec 1714 at Philadelphia Co., PA; proved 10 Jan 1714.
     
  •     3.  vi.   Joseph Shippen, born 28 Feb 1678/79 at Boston, MA; married Abigail Grosse; married Rose Budd.
     
  •       vii.   Mary Shippen was born on 6 May 1681. She died on 30 Aug 1688 at age 7.
     
  •       viii.   Ann Shippen was born on 17 Jun 1684 at Boston, MA. She married Thomas Story on 10 Jul 1706. She died on 6 Dec 1712 at age 28; d.s.p.
Rebecca Howard married Francis Richardson; 1st husband. She died on 26 Feb 1704/5 at Philadelphia, PA.
Known children of Edward2 Shippen and Rebecca Howard were:
  •       i.   Elizabeth3 Shippen was born on 20 Oct 1691 at Boston, MA. She died on 8 Aug 1692 at Boston, MA.
Esther Wilcox was born in 1673. She married William Freeland; 1st husband. She married Philip James; 2nd husband. She died on 7 Aug 1724 at Philadelphia, PA. She left a will on 4 Aug 1724 at Philadelphia Co., PA; proved 20 Oct 1724.
Known children of Edward2 Shippen and Esther Wilcox were as follows:
  •       i.   John3 Shippen was born in 1707. He died in 1707.
     
  •       ii.   William Shippen was born on 3 Oct 1708 at Philadelphia, PA. He died on 3 Feb 1730/31 at age 22; unmarried.

More at:-  http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~marshall/esmd35.htm

Edward Shippen - Born in Methley, Yorkshire, England, in 1639, Edward Shippen emigrated to Boston, MA, in 1668. He joined the Society of Friends and moved his family and business to Philadelphia in about 1694 to avoid religious persecution, eventually becoming mayor of Philadelphia, where his sons and grandsons continued to be prominent.

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/shippen-2#ixzz2sI57TjoT 

Better reading at site below

 please search pages 96 to 109 site below
.
More at:-  http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=arAfWBsvO1gC&lpg=PA96&ots=BsH3z4SWJQ&dq=Shippen%20family%20from%20methley&pg=PA96#v=onepage&q=Shippen%20family%20from%20methley&f=false

Click on Contents as below right of page and choose Shippen Family 96 to page:-

Was Edward Shippen from Methley, Yorkshire or Hillham, Cheshire

Link Below.

More at:-  http://famousamericans.net/edwardshippen/

Mayors of the City of Philadelphia
1691-2000

Edward Shippen Mayor

25-10-1701

24-10-1702

02-10-1744

More at:-  http://www.phila.gov/phils/mayortxt.htm

The Winterthur Library

 The Joseph Downs Collection of Manuscripts and Printed Ephemera

OVERVIEW OF THE COLLECTION 

Creator:          Shippen family             

Title:               Papers

Dates:             1757-1961; bulk 1760-1800

Call No.:         Col. 521

Acc. No.:         [various – see detailed description]

Quantity:        25 items

Location:        36 A 2; map case 3, drawer 3 

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT 

Members of the Shippen family were prominent in Pennsylvania during the 18th century; most resided in Philadelphia.  The patriarch, Edward (1639-1712), served as the first mayor of Philadelphia; his grandson, Edward III (1703-1781), also was mayor.  Edward III's daughter, Sarah, married Col. James Burd.  Other members of the family included Margaret Frances and Edward IV (1729-1806).  Margaret (Peggy) Shippen married Benedict Arnold. 

SCOPE AND CONTENT 

Collection contains miscellaneous items relating to various members of the Shippen family.  The majority are letters, some of which date from the 1700s.  Other items include receipts for goods purchased and photographs and engravings of members of the Shippen family.  There are several obituaries and newspaper writings.  There are copies of two accounts of Edward Shippen, Jr., for furniture, including details of upholstering an easy chair (1754-1755).  Another bill for furniture was sent to Edward Shippen of Lancaster in 1771.  A map shows the route of a road built by Colonel James Burd in 1758.  Genealogical notes have been added to some documents.

More at:-  http://findingaid.winterthur.org/html/HTML_Finding_Aids/COL0521.htm

EDWARD SHIPPEN, b. 1639, who emigrated to America,


and was the founder of the family here.f

* MS. Pedigrees which formerly belonged to the late Judge
Yeates, Judge Shippen, E. S. Burd, &c. Bible Entries of Josepu
Shippen, (son of Edward, the emigrant,) now in possession of Col.
John Hare Powel. Hazard's Reg. IV. 241, (reprinting from the
Portfolio :) * A gentleman of fortune and family, in the county
York.'

j- It will be seen by the following pages that Mr. Griswold has
been misled (Republican Court, p. 15) as to the pedigree of Edward
Shippen.
vi


The particulars of the first William Shippen's parentage,
birth, marriage, death, or place of residence are unknown.
In the Memoirs of James Logan,* his son Edward is made
to say, that 'Alethey' was, at the time of his birth, the
residence of his father. This, however, is presumed to be
a misprint, or an error of the copyist ; there being no such
place, as far as ascertained. It is conjectured, from the
name, that the family was originally of Flemish or Dutch
extraction; a conjecture to which some countenance is
given by the circumstance that the part of Yorkshire in
which Mr. Shippen is supposed to have lived, that lying
between Pontefract and Wakefield, had many Flemish
families settled in it; so much so, that Bigland, says,^
'The Don/ l This last part is called the Dutch River,
t being a canal cut by Cornelius Vermuiden and his Dutch
' and Flemish settlers/
 


That the vicinity of Pontefract or Wakefield was his place
of residence, appears reasonably certain from the fact, that
his son, ' William, was elected to the scholarship in Uni-

* Edward Shippen was father-in-law to Thomas Story, and went
early into Pennsylvania from Boston, whither he had gone from
England in 1675. There he was persecuted for his religion, as a
Friend, and received from the zealots in power, a public whipping.
He was very successful as a merchant in Philadelphia, and amassed
a large fortune, etc. He retained a strong interest towards his fel-
low professors in old England. In a letter to William Ellis, dated
27th of Seventh Month, 1699, he alludes to his having forwarded
for poor Friends, a present of gold. " I have sent by our dear
Friend, Aaron Atkinson, 12f ozs. of gold. It cost here 76 10s.
currency. I suppose it will sell in London for something above 50
sterling, the which I have desired Aaron to sell ; and I leave the
disposing of it to thee and him, among poor Friends, where there is
most need, and where it may be most helpful." He adds, " and if
there be a meeting at Alethey, where I was born, I desire to know ;
and whether they be in want." Memoirs of James Logan, by Wil-
son Armistead. London, 1851, p. 39, (n.)

f ' History of Yorkshire,' p. 900, London, no date. Thome.

EDWARD SHIPPEN, son of the first mentioned William, and

the founder of the family in America,
1639, was born in Yorkshire, England,

1668, emigrated to Boston : persecuted into removing
1693-4, to Philadelphia, where,

1712, October 2d, he died, M. 73.

Of his history in England, nothing is known except
that he wag bred to mercantile pursuits, in which he en-
gaged after his arrival in Boston : very successfully too,
as it appears, that he was, on removing to Philadelphia,
computed to be worth at least 10,000 stg. a sum by
no means inconsiderable in those days, particularly in a new
country. His sagacity and ability largely increased his for-
tune during his residence in Philadelphia.

1669. He was a member of the Ancient and Honorable
Artillery Company, and in

1671, married Elizabeth Lybrand; which marriage, it
is conjectured, led to his embracing Quakerism : and, so
zealous was the convert, that we find

 More at:- http://archive.org/stream/letterspapersrel00balcuoft/letterspapersrel00balcuoft_djvu.txt

Does 'Alethey' above mean Methley, is it a hand written reading error.

Alethley for Methley

Was he born at Methley, West Yorkshire or Hillham, Cheshire, England.

After a long search their is no Hillham or Hilham in the whole of UK but their is Hillam, North Yorkshire LS25 between Garforth and Selby. Their is also a small place just north east of Nashvill, Tennessee, USA called Hilham, 500mile south west of Philadelphia.

On the southeast shore of Lake Dauphin Manitoba, Canada is a Methley Beach, which offers swimming and fishing. Facilities include a beach, campground, picnic shelter, boat launch and pedal boats. Located 16 km (10 miles) north and 5 km (3 miles) west of Ste. Rose du Lac on PTH276 . In May 2013 a Wall of Ice crushed the timber houses around this lake.

Edward Shippen Edward Shippen
The first Mayor of Philadelphia


The Provincial Councilors of Pennsylvania 1733-1776. Those Earlier Councillors Who were some time Chief Magistrates of the Province, and their Descendants Early Councillors who were Chief Magistrates of the Province. Edward Shippen.William Penn named him in the Charter, Oct. 25, 1701 , as the first Mayor of the City of Philadelphia . Penn , as is well known, gave the most anxious consideration to his selection of officers to govern the new city. In Mr. Shippen , he found a man of courage, October 28, 1701 , to the new Provincial Council, no longer an elective body. They were to consult and assist the Proprietary, if in the Colony, and his Deputy or Lieutenant-Governor, for the time being; and in case of the latter's decease or incapacity, to exercise all the powers, jurisdiction, and authority conferred upon Penn by the Charter of King Charles . They were to hold office during the Proprietary's pleasure, and their number could be increased by the Lieutenant-Governor. Edward Shippen was President of the Council 1702-4 , and on the death of Penn 's Deputy, Hamilton , of New Jersey , May, 1703 , became the head of the government, and continued such until the arrival of John Evans , in December . At this time, he was also a Provincial Judge. In 1706 , he contracted his third marriage, which led to his separation from the Society of Friends, and retired from public life, except that he continued to advise upon public affairs, as we find from Penn 's letter, 24th 5 mo., 1712 . His house long bore the name of "the Governor's House." "It was built in the early rise of the city, received then the name of 'Shippey 's Great House,' while Shippen himself was proverbially distinguished for three great things; 'the biggest person, the biggest house, and the biggest coach.'" His country-house stood near the present S. W. corner of South and Broad streets, and his property stretched along the south side of the old city, from Front street to about 16th, Shippen (now Bainbridge) St. being opened through it, and Juniper St., for several squares below South, being called Shippen 's Lane. Edward Shippen d. Phila. , Oct. 2, 1712 . He m., 1st, Elizabeth Lybrand , of Boston , who d. there Oct. 25, 1688

More at:- http://canadianbritishhomechildren.weebly.com/the-du-pont-inscription.html

List of mayors of Philadelphia

Mayor

    Term

     Political party

Humphrey Morrey 1691–1701 (appointed by William Penn)
Edward Shippen 1701–1703 (appointed by Penn to a one-year term, elected by Council to another)
Anthony Morris 1703–1704  
Griffith Jones 1704–1705  
Joseph Willcox 1705–1706  
Nathan Stanbury 1706–1707  
Thomas Masters 1707–1709 (two one-year terms)
Richard Hill 1709–1710  
William Carter 1710–1711  
Samuel Preston 1711–1712  
Jonathan Dickinson 1712–1713  
George Roch 1713–1714  
Richard Hill 1714–1717 (2nd, three one-year terms)
Jonathan Dickinson 1717–1719 (2nd, two one-year terms)
William Fishbourn 1719–1722 (three one-year terms)
James Logan 1722–1723  
Clement Plumsted 1723–1724  
Isaac Norris 1724–1725  
William Hudson 1725–1726  
Charles Read 1726–1727  
Thomas Lawrence (I) 1727–1729 (two one-year terms)
Thomas Griffitts 1729–1731 (two one-year terms)
Samuel Hasell 1731–1733 (two one-year terms)
Thomas Griffitts 1733–1734 (2nd)
Thomas Lawrence (I) 1734–1735 (2nd)
William Allen 1735–1736  
Clement Plumsted 1736–1737 (2nd)
Thomas Griffitts 1737–1738 (3rd)
Anthony Morris 1738–1739  
Edward Roberts 1739–1740  
Samuel Hasell 1740–1741 (2nd)
Clement Plumsted 1741–1742 (3rd)
William Till 1742–1743  
Benjamin Shoemaker 1743–1744  
Edward Shippen (II) 1744–1745  
James Hamilton 1745–1746  
William Attwood 1746–1748 (two one-year terms)
Charles Willing 1748–1749  
Thomas Lawrence (I) 1749–1750 (3rd)
William Plumsted 1750–1751  
Robert Strettell 1751–1752  
Benjamin Shoemaker 1752–1753 (2nd)
Thomas Lawrence (I) 1753–1754 (4th)
Charles Willing 1754 (2nd, Replaced Thomas Lawrence (I), deceased)
William Plumsted 1754–1756 (Replaced Charles Willing, deceased) (2nd, two one-year terms)
Attwood Shute 1756–1758 (two one-year terms)
Thomas Lawrence (II) 1758–1759  
John Stamper 1759–1760  
Benjamin Shoemaker 1760–1761 (3rd)
Jacob Duchι, Sr. 1761–1762  
Henry Harrison 1762–1763  
Thomas Willing 1763–1764  
Thomas Lawrence (II) 1764–1765 (2nd)
John Lawrence 1765–1767 (two one-year terms)
Isaac Jones 1767–1769 (two one-year terms)
Samuel Shoemaker 1769–1771 (two one-year terms)
John Gibson 1771–1773 (two one-year terms)
William Fisher 1773–1774  
Samuel Rhoads 1774–1775
Samuel Powel 1775–1776  
(vacant) 1776–1789  
Samuel Powel 1789–1790 (2nd)
Samuel Miles 1790–1791  
John Barclay 1791–1792  
Matthew Clarkson 1792–1796 (four one-year terms)
Hilary Baker 1796–1798 (two one-year terms)
Robert Wharton 1798–1800 (two one-year terms)
John Inskeep 1800–1801  
Matthew Lawler 1801–1805 (four one-year terms)
John Inskeep 1805–1806 (2nd)
Robert Wharton 1806–1808 (2nd, two one-year terms)
John Barker 1808-1810 (two one-year terms)
Robert Wharton 1810–1811 (3rd)
Michael Keppele 1811–1812  
John Barker 1812–1813 (2nd)
John Geyer 1813–1814  
Robert Wharton 1814–1819 (4th, five one-year terms)
James Nelson Barker 1819–1820  
Robert Wharton 1820–1824 (5th, four one-year terms)
Joseph Watson 1824–1828 (four one-year terms)
George Mifflin Dallas 1828–1829  
Benjamin Wood Richards 1829  
William Milnor 1829–1830  
Benjamin Wood Richards 1830–1831 (2nd)
John Swift 1832–1838  
Isaac Roach 1838–1839  
John Swift 1839–1841 (2nd, two one-year terms)
John Morin Scott 1841–1844 Whig
Peter McCall 1844–1845  
John Swift 1845–1849 Whig (3rd, 1st popularly elected)
Joel Jones 1849–1850  
Charles Gilpin 1850–1854 Whig
Robert Thomas Conrad 1854–1856 Whig, two-year terms instituted
Richard Vaux 1856–1858 Democratic
Alexander Henry 1858–1866 People's Party, National Union Party, (Aligned with Republican Party)
Morton McMichael 1866–1869 Republican
Daniel Fox 1869–1872 Democratic
William Strumberg Stokley 1872–1881 Republican
Samuel George King 1881–1884  
William Burns Smith 1884–1887 Republican
Edwin Henry Fitler 1887–1891 Republican (four-year terms instituted)
Edwin Sydney Stuart 1891–1895 Republican
Charles Franklin Warwick 1895–1899 Republican
Samuel Howell Ashbridge 1899–1903 Republican
John Weaver 1903–1907 Republican
John E. Reyburn 1907–1911 Republican
Rudolph Blankenburg 1911–1916 Republican (independent) elected on Keystone-Democratic ticket
Thomas B. Smith 1916–1920 Republican
J. Hampton Moore 1920–1924 Republican
W. Freeland Kendrick 1924–1928 Republican
Harry Arista Mackey 1928–1931 Republican
J. Hampton Moore 1932–1936 Republican (2nd)
Samuel Davis Wilson 1936–1939 Republican (died in office)
George Connell 1939–1940 Acting mayor for the balance of Wilson's term after Wilson's death.
Robert Eneas Lamberton January 1, 1940 – August 22, 1941 Republican (died in office)
Bernard Samuel August 22, 1941 – January 7, 1952 Republican
Joseph S. Clark Jr. January 7, 1952 – January 2, 1956 Democratic
Richardson Dilworth January 2, 1956 – February 12, 1962 Democratic (elected to two four-year terms; resigned)
James Hugh Joseph Tate February 12, 1962 – January 3, 1972 Democratic (succeeded Dilworth; then elected to two four-year terms)
Frank L. Rizzo January 3, 1972 – January 7, 1980 Democratic (two four-year terms)
William J. Green III January 7, 1980 – January 2, 1984 Democratic
W. Wilson Goode January 2, 1984 – January 6, 1992 Democratic (two four-year terms)
Edward G. Rendell January 6, 1992 – January 3, 2000 Democratic (two four-year terms)
John F. Street January 3, 2000 – January 7, 2008 Democratic (two four-year terms)
Michael Nutter January 7, 2008–present Democratic (incumbent)

More at:-  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mayors_of_Philadelphia

 Edward Shippen

Edward Shippen

 Birth: 1639, England
Death: Oct. 2, 1712
Philadelphia
Philadelphia County
Pennsylvania, USA

Edward Shippen was a native (born 1639) of Yorkshire, where his family, having removed anciently from Cheshire, had for a long period their ancestral hall,— Hellham. He emigrated, in 1668, to Boston, where in mercantile pursuits he in a few years accumulated a fortune of ten thousand pounds. A member of the Church of England, he married Elizabeth Sybrand, a Quakeress, and adopted her faith; and during several years bore courageously his part of the persecutions inflicted on that sect by the Puritans. On the appearance, in 1693, of a meteor in the heavens, over Boston, the authorities there, supposing that they were threatened with the vengeance of heaven for their mildness in the punishment of Quakers and Baptists, turned upon them such vials of wrath that Mr. Shippen was driven to seek a home in the city of Penn. But before he left Boston he erected a monument, which he in vain endeavored and hoped to make enduring, near what he styled "a pair of gallows, where several of our friends had suffered death for the truth, and were thrown into a hole." He soon acquired by his wealth and character so high a position in his new home that he was
elected (1695) Speaker of the Assembly, and made by popular vote, the next year, one of the Provincial Council, and returned to the same office at several successive elections. In 1700 he was nominated to the same board by Penn, and became one of the justices of Philadelphia County, and afterward the first mayor of the city. For a while he was at the head of the government, and was made one of the judges of the Provincial Supreme Court. His marriage (for the third time) led to his separation from the Quakers. He died in 1712. He was distinguished proverbially (says Keith, Provincial Council) for three great things: "the biggest person, the biggest house, and the biggest coach." His country-house stood at what is now the southwest corner of South and Broad Streets.

SHIPPEN, Edward, mayor of Philadelphia, born in Hillham, Cheshire, England, in 1639; died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2 October, 1712. He was the son of William Shippen. His brother, Reverend William Shippen, D. D., was rector of Stockport, Cheshire, and his nephew, Robert Shippen, D. D., was principal of Brasenose college, and vice-chancellor of Oxford university. Edward was bred to mercantile pursuits, and emigrated to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1668, where he became a wealthy merchant. In 1671 he became a member of the Ancient and honorable artillery company of Boston. He married Elizabeth Lybrand, a Quakeress, united with that sect, and shared the "jailings, whippings, and banishments, the fines and imprisonments," that were inflicted on the Quakers. In 1693 Mr. Shippen was either banished or driven to take refuge in Philadelphia. He did not quit Boston without erecting a memorial on "a green," near to "a pair of gallows, where several of our friends had suffered death fox' the truth, and were thrown into a hole." He asked leave of the magistrates to erect some more lasting monument there, but they were not willing. About the time he was leaving he gave a piece of land for a Friends' meeting-house, located in Brattles pasture, on Brattle street, near the site of the Quincey house, and on which was constructed the first brick church in Boston. In Philadelphia his wealth and character obtained for him position and influence. In 1695 he was elected to the assembly, and chosen speaker. In 1696 he was elected to the provincial council, of which he continued a member till his death, and for ten years he was the senior member.

He was commissioned a justice of the peace in the same year, and in 1697 a judge of the supreme court, and the presiding judge of the courts of common pleas and quarter sessions and the orphan's court. In 1701 he became mayor of Philadelphia, being so named in William Penn's city charter of that year, and during this year he was appointed by Penn to be one of his commissioners of property, which office Shippen held till his death.

As president of the council, he was the head of the government from May until December, 1703. In 1704, and for several years thereafter, he was chosen one of the aldermen, and from 1 June. 1705, till 1712 he was the treasurer of the city. He contracted his third marriage in 1706, which led to his withdrawal from the Society of Friends. His house long bore the name of "the Governor's House." It was built in the early rise of the city, received then the name of ' Shippen's Great House, ' while Shippen himself was proverbially distinguished for three great things--' the biggest person, the biggest house, and the biggest coach.' "

More at:-  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=18313283

Notes for Edward Shippen:
from "Appletons' [sic] Cyclopaedia of American Biography":

"SHIPPEN, Edward, mayor of Philadelphia, b. in Hillham, Cheshire, England, in 1639; d. in Philadelphia, Pa., 2 Oct., 1712. He was the son of William Shippen. His brother, Rev. William Shippen, D.D., was rector of Stockport, Cheshire, and his nephew, Robert Shippen, D.D., was principal of Brasenose college, and vice-chancellor of Oxford university. Edward was bred to mercantile pursuits, and emigrated to Boston, Mass., in 1668, where he became a wealthy merchant. In 1671 he became a member of the Ancient and honorable artillery company of Boston. He married Elizabeth Lybrand, a Quakeress, united with that sect, and shared the 'jailings, whippings, and banishments, the fines and imprisonments,' that were inflicted on the Quakers. In 1693 Mr. Shippen was either banished or driven to take refuge in Philadelphia. He did not quit Boston without erecting a memorial on 'a green,' near to 'a pair of gallows, where several of our friends had suggered death for the truth, and were thrown into a hole.' He asked leave of the magistrates to erect some more lasting monument there, but they were not willing. About the time he was leaving he gave a piece of land for a Friends' meeting-house, located in Brattle's pasture, on Brattle street, near the site of the Quincey house, and on which was constructed the first brick church in Boston. In Philadelphia his wealth and character obtained for him position and influence. In 1695 he was elected to the assembly, and chosen speaker. In 1696 he was elected to the provincial council, of which he continued a member till his death, and for ten years he was the senior member. He was commissioned a justice of the peace in the same year, and in 1697 a judge of the supreme court, and the presiding judge of the courts of common pleas and quarter sessions and the orphan's court. In 1701 he became mayor of Philadelphia, being so named in William Penn's city charter that year, and during this year he was appointed by Penn to be one of his commissioners of property, which office Shippen held till his death. As president of the council, he was the head of government from May until December, 1703. In 1704, and for several years thereafter, he was chosen one of the aldermen, and from 1 June, 1705, till 1712 he was the treasurer of the city. He contracted his third marriage in 1706, which led to his withdrawal from the Society of Friends. His house long bore the name of 'the Governor's House.' 'It was built in the early rise of the city, received then the name of "Shippen's Great House," while Shippen himself was proverbially distinguished for three great things--"the biggest person, the biggest house, and the biggest coach."'"

More About Edward Shippen:
Christening: March 05, 1638/39, Methley, York, England
     
Child of Edward Shippen and Elizabeth Lybrand is:
 

Joseph Shippen, born February 28, 1678/79 in Boston, Suffolk, MA; died July 28, 1741 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA; married Abigail Gross August 05, 1702 in Boston, Suffolk, MA.

More at:- http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/b/a/t/Robert-A-Battle/BOOK-0001/0002-0032.html

Once the Shippen's house

Property at Low Common

The modernised property, once the Shippen's house, is at the rear of Commonside being the east side of the Common. It is now two residences.

PoliticalGraveyard.com

 Edward Shippen (1639-1712) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in England, 1639. Son of William Shippen . Merchant; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1701-03. Quaker. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., August, 1712 (age about 73 years). Interment at Old Pine Street Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.

More at:-  http://politicalgraveyard.com/families/10103.html

Also Link below:-

Edward Shippen (1639, Hillham, Cheshire, England – August 1712, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was the second mayor of Philadelphia. He was appointed to a one year term by William Penn in 1701. In 1702, he was elected to a second one year term, making him the first elected mayor of Philadelphia. From that point, mayors were elected to one year terms, until 1887, when the current term of four years was established. He was also a leader of the Province of Pennsylvania, and served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in 1699.

He first lived in Boston, where, according to family oral history, he was whipped for being a Quaker before being invited by William Penn to move his merchant business the new city of Philadelphia.

More at:-  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Shippen

More at:-  http://digital.library.pitt.edu/cgi-bin/f/findaid/findaid-idx?c=ascead&cc=ascead&rgn=main&view=text&didno=US-PPiU-dar196601


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